Aspire Cabinetry

There are three styles of kitchens: Contemporary, Traditional and Transitional. The choice of the style depends on the home owner’s budget and needs. Purchasing cabinetry is a big investment that will remain in the home for years. There are two main options when purchasing cabinetry: framed or frameless. For years, Wellborn Cabinet, Inc. only offered one of those options, but now the time has come to broaden our options in order to better fit our customers’ needs.

At KBIS 2016, Wellborn Cabinet, Inc. announced that we will be launching our new frameless line, Aspire Cabinetry, in 2017. Aspire will be a full access frameless cabinet brand that will help bring the contemporary, sleek look in the home. Frameless not only provides a modern look, but it can still provide a traditional style without having to add the extra frame on the cabinetry.

Framed vs. Frameless:

Framed cabinetry provides a more traditional and transitional style. For years, framed has always been the most popular style of cabinetry in the United States because of its endless options and durability. The trends have begun to shift and frameless cabinetry is now an option that most homeowners are considering. Wellborn offers endless options of framed cabinetry between our lines, Estate Collection, Premier Series, Select Series, Home Concepts and Elegant Bath Collection.

According to the name, frameless cabinetry is constructed without a face frame. Frameless cabinetry provides more storage and accessibility in a cabinet because it does not have a center stile coming down in the middle of the two cabinet doors. Also, drawers in frameless tend to have more storage space due to the lack of a face frame.

“Our new Aspire Full Access Frameless line is set to launch in 2017. With this addition to the many brands Wellborn offers, including, Wellborn Select and Premier Series, Estate, Closets and Elegant Bath Furniture line.” Angela O’Neill, Director of Marketing added, “Aspire adds the finishing touch to our product offering.”

Construction of Framed:

The standard face frame for the Wellborn doors are ¾” x 1 ¾” Kiln-dried solid wood stile and rail members. The center stiles are ¾” x 3 ½” solid wood. On all corner base and corner wall cabinets, the center stiles are ¾” x 6 ½” solid wood. 48” corner base has a 9 ½” center stile. All face frame joints are precisely aligned with blind mortise and tenon, glued and stapled at all joints.

Construction of Frameless:

Frameless cabinetry is constructed without the face frame located at the front of the cabinet. The logical reasoning behind this idea was to provide more room for accessibility and storage. The cabinet construction is ¾” thick thermofused melamine end panels, shelves, tops and cabinet bottoms. All the doors have a fully concealed Euro cup hinges with a six-way adjustability. The doors include a self-closing soft close feature, for that ever so quiet close. Wellborn Cabinet’s brand will offer two drawer options: a 5/8 solid wood dovetail drawer with natural finish and a double sided metal drawer with powder coated steel in silver color.

Frameless Pros:

Storage– Frameless cabinetry provides room for more storage due to the absence of the face frame.

Contemporary look-the European style cabinetry gives the home a more modern appeal

Quick Construction– The frameless cabinets provide a quicker construction and installation.

We have exciting plans for this brand, and we cannot wait to see where this takes us in the future. As we travel on this journey, we invite you to follow along as we introduce the Aspire Cabinetry line. We envision an incredible outcome for our company!

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To learn more about other kitchen styles: check out our “What’s Your Kitchen Style?” blog!

 

Closet Design with Denise Butchko – Shoe Storage – What's Your Pick?

Cubbies Aren’t Just a Chicago Baseball Team – Or Are They? So what do baseball and Chicago have to do with design?  Well, with baseball, I’m not sure yet.

But in reference to design, the answer is a lot. There’s ton of great design and architecture in the windy city and fair amount has been driven by famed minimalist architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. If you’ve ever heard the saying that “less is more” – it came from Ludwig.  761615993279b4921105864fb68cc191

Being a Chicago gal, his philosophy and mine are quite harmonious. So, while embellishments are beautiful and I really appreciate and admire the look of a space (say, kitchen or closet) that has base and crown moldings and columns and detailed designs on the doors and drawers, I love simple.

And if you boil down simple into designed closet solutions, in my book, shelves are better than cubbies. They’re also more functional and space-saving than angled shelves.

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And here’s the “science” (Butchko science, that is) behind that:

Lots of people see – and then want – angled shoe shelves.

I can see why.  They’re pretty.  They also allow you to see more of your shoe at a glance, which is a plus.

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The counter sides to pretty are:

-Angled shoe shelves are more expensive than flat, adjustable shelves

-Angled shoe shelves take up more space than flat, adjustable shelving

-Angled shoe shelves can pretty much just be used for shoes – and perhaps magazines – and who stores magazines in their closet? (If you do – I do NOT want to hear about that!)

So if you need to maximize every inch – and/or the client thinks they will re-sell their home in the next five years – I recommend flat, adjustable shelving.

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Regarding “Cubbies” (unless you’re referring to that Northside Chicago baseball team) – the short answer is that I am not a fan. I’m all about being organized (and have said for years that an organized life is easier to live) but cubbies are “over organized”. When shoe styles change and now you have wedge sandals – you can only fit one per cubbie. And what else can you store in those cubbies?

Don’t say magazines. And don’t say “world series titles” either (although in reference to the Chicago Cubs, there’s plenty of space for that!).

I’ve done one – count em – one – master closet with shoe cubbies in my +ten years of designing and that was because the client absolutely insisted.

Just because an idea looks like a good one doesn’t always mean that it is.

So here’s to making your closet designs more effective. And if you’d like to keep learning more, join me in the platform of your choice so we can connect!

Google+ Community – Marketing Interior Design 

Facebook – Butchko&Company

You Tube  – Denise Butchko

What’s that you say? You don’t have a platform of choice? Oh my! Check out some insights on any of mine and get rolling. You’re “burnin’ daylight” as Dr. Phil would say.

About our Guest Blogger: Ms. Denise Butchko

By merging a unique background of custom storage design and marketing, I’m able to share great, industry specific tips to help you with your business, whether that’s designed solutions or social media marketing guidance. I’ve been designing closets for over a decade and serve as a judge for our industry “Top Shelf” Design Awards. I’m also a member of the first graduating class of Registered Storage Designers through the Association of Closet and Storage Professionals. I love teaching and sharing – in person and online – and look forward to connecting with you, so join me on any (or all) of my social profiles.

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Teaching You Social Media Best Practices
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2013 Design Contest Winner: Glen Lumia – Other Rooms – 3rd Place

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Designer: Glen Lumia

Dealer: Creative Design Construction, Northvale, New Jersey

Design Goals and Details: We had a blank canvas to work with in designing the bar for our clients, as it was incorporated in a full scale renovation of the basement. The focal point of the space features a custom wet bar with raised granite to create a dramatic space for entertaining family and friends. It includes a beverage center, ice machine, and plenty of additional seating for guests. The bar features the Hanover door style in Cherry, highlighted with an Espresso finish. We incorporated glass upper cabinets to show off the client’s stemware and achieve the modern vision the client’s hoped for.

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Deep or Shallow?

By: Denise Butchko

We’re not talking about personality here – we’re talking about the shelves in your closets and storage spaces. 🙂

When people show me closet spaces – they often feel compelled to “use every inch”. So whether the closet is 24” deep (standard depth for a reach-in closet) or 38” deep (space left over that a builder turns in to a closet), they want shelves that are as deep as the closet itself. Bad idea.

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“Big Black Hole”

Extremely deep shelving is not only more expensive, but it creates what I refer to as “the big, black hole”.

If you want to remember it with a rhyme – deep shelving “increases cost and things get lost”.

Here a couple rules of thumb:

-The deeper the shelf – the farther apart the shelves should be spaced.

-Small items work best on shallow shelves. An ultimate luxury is being able to see every item that’s on your shelves. So if we’re talking about your pantry, let’s avoid having 37 cans of tomato soup with expiration dates from 2007 hidden behind today’s juice box purchases.  Think: open door – look at shelf – find needed item – grab and go.  Closets aren’t gardens – we don’t want digging.

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Remember this rhyme about deep shelving – “increases cost and things get lost”

-Larger items can work on deeper shelves – things like pillows and blankets or furniture cushions.  But be aware – the deeper the shelf – the greater the propensity for the client to overload the shelf. The added weight could be a service call waiting to happen – so reinforce those deep shelves whenever possible.

So here’s to making your closet designs more effective. And if you’d like to keep learning more, join me in the platform of your choice so we can connect!

Google+ Community – Marketing Interior Design 

Facebook – Butchko&Company

You Tube  – Denise Butchko

What’s that you say? You don’t have a platform of choice? Oh my! Check out some insights on any of mine and get rolling. You’re “burnin’ daylight” as Dr. Phil would say.

About our Guest Blogger: Ms. Denise Butchko

By merging a unique background of custom storage design and marketing, I’m able to share great, industry specific tips to help you with your business, whether that’s designed solutions or social media marketing guidance. I’ve been designing closets for over a decade and serve as a judge for our industry “Top Shelf” Design Awards. I’m also a member of the first graduating class of Registered Storage Designers through the Association of Closet and Storage Professionals. I love teaching and sharing – in person and online – and look forward to connecting with you, so join me on any (or all) of my social profiles.

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Teaching You Social Media Best Practices
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And if you’re looking to go deeper in to closet design – I’ve got your solution. I’ve created the FIRST EVER INDEPENDENT closet design course – ON LINE!

If you’re wanting to learn about closet design, or become better at closet design – this the opportunity for you to make that happen!

https://ruzuku.com/courses/458/signup

All-American Cottage – An All-American Treasure

As a Family Owned and American Made company for over 52 years, Wellborn Cabinet is proud to announce its partnership with Southern Living and This Old House on the All American Cottage.

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Inspired by the nationwide groundswell of interest in American-made products, Southern Living and This Old House are joining forces with Wellborn Cabinet, Cabinets & Tops of the Upstate and Dillard-Jones Builders to construct an All-American Cottage.

Located in the quintessential southern community of Verdae in Greenville, South Carolina, The All-American Cottage will be a stunning showcase and testimony to the ingenuity and quality craftsmanship of products made in the U.S.A.

We are excited to share with you an interview and the photo tour that is currently on Southern Living’s Website. Enjoy!

MEET THE BUILDER  – WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO BUILD ALL-AMERICAN? 

Tom Dillard, Greenville, South Carolina
Tom Dillard, of Dillard-Jones Builders – Greenville, South Carolina

As a former manufacturing guy, I’ve seen first-hand the results of taking a raw material to a finished product that is sold on the open market. Manufacturing means jobs, and a lot of them. After almost a decade in the custom home building industry, I have seen a decline in U.S. construction jobs–a lot of it due to the use of materials and products made somewhere other than the United States. When I saw the news coverage on Montana home builder Anders Lewendal and his commitment to build a home with materials made in the USA, I was inspired to try it myself, especially after reading that the use of just 5% of USA-made materials in the construction of a new home means 220,000 jobs.

WHAT’S THE INSPIRATION BEHIND THE DESIGN?

Our goal was to create smaller open floor plans with a strong focus on outdoor living areas. We have done this, in part, by taking cues from what we see as emerging new trends in plan design. Our designs include a focus on a spa-like master shower and no tub, and casual dining instead of formal rooms.

WHAT ARE YOUR FAVORITE FEATURES THAT MAKE THIS COTTAGE SPECIAL?

This home has great windows bringing in as much light as possible into the main living spaces. A variety of outdoor living areas expand the living space and 10′ ceilings in the main level help create an even larger feel.

All-American Photo Tour

Detail in the Details
Detail in the Details

In true All-American style, the Cottage features board-and-batten style shutters from Southern Traditions Window Fashions of Greenville, SC and custom made locally in Fountain Inn, SC. Adding to the authenticity and true southern touch of the shutters is the hand crafted shutter hinges and holdbacks by The Heirloom Companies of Campobello, SC.

Crisp and Clean
Crisp and Clean

The alley-style master bathroom beams an expansive walk-in shower and neutral colored cabinets and countertops that connect together for a crisp and clean feel. Cabinets are made and sourced in the USA by Wellborn Cabinet of Ashland, AL and Corian Counterops.

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Subtle but Impactful

The interior of the All American Cottage features LP SmartSide panels, one of the fastest growing brands of interior and exterior siding in America.

You truly have to see this wall treatment in person – it is simple style.

From mountain to rock to countertops, the crisp granite pairs nicely with the subway style tiling and Wellborn Cabinets of the Kitchen. Sourced from a fittingly named city, the countertops were procured from Stone Mountain Ga and installed by Carolina Foothills Studio of Travelers Rest, SC.

Every Detail in the Kitchen is lovely.
Every Detail in the Kitchen is lovely.
All-American Kitchen
All-American Kitchen

The kitchen of the All American Cottage features Monterey Style Maple cabinets in Glacier Pewter Finish provided by Wellborn Cabinet, Inc. of Ashland, Alabama and Made In USA stainless appliances from Dacor.

Again, we are truly proud to be part of a great All-American project and working with such great companies and sponsors!

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