White – A Classic Standard

I am part of a “NKBA” group on Linkedin and a discussion is going on right now: “What colors are trending right now in kitchens?” And hands down White is the color of choice – all shades of white! From warm to bright, glaze to no glaze, cream to antique, and the list goes on and on.  Certain key points were made that I would like to share with you – I found some excellent Wellborn Cabinet Designs from our dealers and designers on Houzz to illustrate what is going on right now!

  • Clean lines, simple door styles with a modern feel while delicate hints of “personal style” are still scattered through-out the spaces.
  • Use color on islands and certain “special” cabinets for that unique pop of color.
  • Painted White with Glazing is still strong in certain markets.
  • Gray has been coined as the new “White” or “Neutral”. Stay tuned in 2014 for more “gray” from Wellborn Cabinet.
Remember all whites are trending right now – antique, warm, with or without glaze, classic, soft, creams, bright – every white under the sun.
So what colors are trending in kitchens right now in your area?

Made By Americans Who Care

Wellborn Cabinet, Inc. is excited to announce the release of our *NEW* corporate video, the first of a series of videos being released over the next few months.
Video Highlights:

  • Explore the Production Process from beginning to end

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  • Highlighting cutting-edge technology; technology has touched every part of our daily lives and the manufacturing industry is not exempt!
  • Mr. Paul Wellborn, CEO & President, Stephen Wellborn, Dir. of Research & Development, Ralph Headrick, Assembly Plant Manager, and Angela O’Neill, Dir. of Marketing & Advertising, all share interesting details about our products.
  • Featuring great new product footage that has never been seen before.

We hope you enjoy!

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Deep or Shallow?

By: Denise Butchko

We’re not talking about personality here – we’re talking about the shelves in your closets and storage spaces. 🙂

When people show me closet spaces – they often feel compelled to “use every inch”. So whether the closet is 24” deep (standard depth for a reach-in closet) or 38” deep (space left over that a builder turns in to a closet), they want shelves that are as deep as the closet itself. Bad idea.

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“Big Black Hole”

Extremely deep shelving is not only more expensive, but it creates what I refer to as “the big, black hole”.

If you want to remember it with a rhyme – deep shelving “increases cost and things get lost”.

Here a couple rules of thumb:

-The deeper the shelf – the farther apart the shelves should be spaced.

-Small items work best on shallow shelves. An ultimate luxury is being able to see every item that’s on your shelves. So if we’re talking about your pantry, let’s avoid having 37 cans of tomato soup with expiration dates from 2007 hidden behind today’s juice box purchases.  Think: open door – look at shelf – find needed item – grab and go.  Closets aren’t gardens – we don’t want digging.

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Remember this rhyme about deep shelving – “increases cost and things get lost”

-Larger items can work on deeper shelves – things like pillows and blankets or furniture cushions.  But be aware – the deeper the shelf – the greater the propensity for the client to overload the shelf. The added weight could be a service call waiting to happen – so reinforce those deep shelves whenever possible.

So here’s to making your closet designs more effective. And if you’d like to keep learning more, join me in the platform of your choice so we can connect!

Google+ Community – Marketing Interior Design 

Facebook – Butchko&Company

You Tube  – Denise Butchko

What’s that you say? You don’t have a platform of choice? Oh my! Check out some insights on any of mine and get rolling. You’re “burnin’ daylight” as Dr. Phil would say.

About our Guest Blogger: Ms. Denise Butchko

By merging a unique background of custom storage design and marketing, I’m able to share great, industry specific tips to help you with your business, whether that’s designed solutions or social media marketing guidance. I’ve been designing closets for over a decade and serve as a judge for our industry “Top Shelf” Design Awards. I’m also a member of the first graduating class of Registered Storage Designers through the Association of Closet and Storage Professionals. I love teaching and sharing – in person and online – and look forward to connecting with you, so join me on any (or all) of my social profiles.

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Teaching You Social Media Best Practices
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And if you’re looking to go deeper in to closet design – I’ve got your solution. I’ve created the FIRST EVER INDEPENDENT closet design course – ON LINE!

If you’re wanting to learn about closet design, or become better at closet design – this the opportunity for you to make that happen!

https://ruzuku.com/courses/458/signup

Shoe Storage As Command Central

By: Denise Butchko

Shoe storage – and the location of shoe storage – is always at the top of a clients’ list when it comes to designing their closet space.

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So here’s what I recommend after figuring out where to store over 5000 pair of shoes (it’s really closer to a million, but who’s counting?) during my career as a closet designer:

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While it’s true that we (women) may decide on the shoes we want to wear and then build our outfit around that, the shoes are typically the last clothing item we put on.

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So I design from the perspective of last on – first off (because shoe’s are typically the first item of clothing we remove when we get home). That translates to having some shoe storage close to the entrance of a closet space so it’s easy to put those shoes back where they belong (instead of kicking them off on the floor and having them be in the way).

One of my favorite ways to do this is to use a configuration called “Half and Half” (coffee, anyone?). That is a short hang rod with shelving above it.

First of all, as a woman of great height (61” in all), I love being able to easily see and reach the items I wear the most.  It’s that 80/20 rule.  This section often becomes “command central” because the garments and shoes that you grab most of the time live in this section for easy access.

If the return wall is too shallow in a walk in closet to allow for hanging right by the door – then use a full column of shelving and it can be used for either all shoes – or shoes and folded items that are worn most frequently.

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So here’s to making your closet designs more effective. And if you’d like to keep learning more, join me in the platform of your choice so we can connect!

Google+ Community – Marketing Interior Design 

Facebook – Butchko&Company

You Tube  – Denise Butchko

What’s that you say? You don’t have a platform of choice? Oh my! Check out some insights on any of mine and get rolling. You’re “burnin’ daylight” as Dr. Phil would say.

About our Guest Blogger: Ms. Denise Butchko

By merging a unique background of custom storage design and marketing, I’m able to share great, industry specific tips to help you with your business, whether that’s designed solutions or social media marketing guidance. I’ve been designing closets for over a decade and serve as a judge for our industry “Top Shelf” Design Awards. I’m also a member of the first graduating class of Registered Storage Designers through the Association of Closet and Storage Professionals. I love teaching and sharing – in person and online – and look forward to connecting with you, so join me on any (or all) of my social profiles.

deniseheader
Teaching You Social Media Best Practices
logo

Just Say “NO” To Shelves Below

by Denise Butchko

The closet consultation conversation often begins with the client saying: “And I’d like some shelves for shoes on the bottom”. If you’ve designed a dozen or more closets – you’ve heard this request from a client.

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Maybe it’s time for a change!

Just because you were raised with storing your shoes on the floor underneath the single hanging rod that existed inside your reach-in closet DOES NOT mean it’s the best practice to employ today.

And just because you see it advertised that way does not make it a good idea either.

Typical hanging garments average 24” in depth. That means when they are hanging on a hanger inside your closet, they occupy about two feet of space.

I’m willing to bet that NOT ONE of you reading this has feet that are 24”.  I don’t even think Shaquille O’Neal has feet that big.

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Wow!

So what that means is that if you put shelving underneath hanging, you’ve got to clear your clothing out of the way to be able to see what’s on that shelf. You’re looking down into the darkness to find your black shoes.

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Makes perfect sense….Right?

Makes sense to me.

Make finding your shoes as difficult as possible.

How about the opposite?

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Bring your shoes into the light.

Best practice in the closet industry is to bring those shoes into the light (pretty high minded of us isn’t it, outwardly worshiping shoes in such as a way as to allow them prime location in our closet space).

Yes, you can put 24” deep shelves below your hanging, but if you do that, those shelves should be pull out shelves or you’ll never remember the items that get pushed to the back on this deep of a down low shelf.

If you want drawers under hanging – that’s an option but standard industry drawers are 14” and 16” deep – so your hanging will “hang out” (and not in a cool way) over the standard drawers and block your access.  It’s also a bit more difficult for people who are petite to reach that higher rod – so it’s not a design practice I ever put in to play.

So you either put shelving above a short hang rod or do an entire column (or stack or section) of shelves to accommodate any items you would normally store on shelves – be it jeans, t-shirts and yes – even shoes.

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Use Shelving to create areas for T-shirts, jeans and linens. It’s up to you!

And how do you keep learning these wonderful insights and tips so your designs become more effective and your sales increase?

Join me in the platform of your choice so we can connect!

Google+ Community – Marketing Interior Design 

Facebook – Butchko&Company

You Tube  – Denise Butchko

What’s that you say? You don’t have a platform of choice? Oh my! Check out some insights on any of mine and get rolling. You’re “burnin’ daylight” as Dr. Phil would say.

About our Guest Blogger: Ms. Denise Butchko

By merging a unique background of custom storage design and marketing, I’m able to share great, industry specific tips to help you with your business, whether that’s designed solutions or social media marketing guidance. I’ve been designing closets for over a decade and serve as a judge for our industry “Top Shelf” Design Awards. I’m also a member of the first graduating class of Registered Storage Designers through the Association of Closet and Storage Professionals. I love teaching and sharing – in person and online – and look forward to connecting with you, so join me on any (or all) of my social profiles.

deniseheader
Teaching You Social Media Best Practices
logo
Official Website for Butchko & Company

Mistakes To Avoid When House-Hunting

House-hunting can be both an exciting and daunting process. The idea of moving to a new home, especially if you’re a first-time buyer can be enthralling and yet there are many pitfalls you can easily fall into when it comes to choosing your new house. Here are some of the most common mistakes you’ll want to avoid when house-hunting.

  • Try not to aim too high when looking for a house. If you’re buying through an estate agent, they might throw in a viewing that’s way out of your price range but right up your alley. Don’t waste your time viewing properties that are out of your budget, even if it’s only marginally. You should have calculated your budget accurately and precisely, and even an increase of a thousand dollars can have a negative effect on the rest of your calculations. If it’s too expensive, it isn’t for you. Move on!

Mistakes to avoid when househunting (2)

  • It could be that you find the perfect house for you, but that it’s in an undesirable neighborhood or it could need some major repair work. It’s important not to ignore any flaws in the houses you view, even if they are otherwise seemingly perfect. Small flaws or things that might need renovation could end up being extremely costly, so be wary when on your viewings!
  • If you’re house-hunting on a budget another easy mistake to make is to over-compromise. You should make a list of the property requirements you want, such as a garden or off-road parking capabilities. If the property you’re viewing doesn’t have what you’re looking for then you can probably do better. Be realistic about what you’re looking for though, don’t expect a Jacuzzi and swimming pool if your budget won’t allow for it!
  • You should also be aware of repair works that need to take place. You might be able to convince yourself that re-tiling the bathroom is an easy task, or that re-wiring the living room is perfectly acceptable for you to do. Try to remain realistic about your handyman capabilities. If you end up buying a house that needs cleaning and renovations you just aren’t capable of, you could end up paying a small fortune.
  • Once you’ve found the place for you, it’s time to put in an offer. It’s easy to make mistakes here, so tread lightly. Don’t rush to make an offer if you have any qualms about the property. Take your time when making the final decision – home ownership is a big investment and not one to be taken lightly!

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  • When you’re absolutely sure you’re sure, you can make the offer. Don’t take too long in making your decision, as it’s likely that someone else has their eye on this property too. Try to ask your estate agent how long the house has been on the market or how many viewings the place has had, so you can figure out how long you have to act.
  • The final thing to be wary of is how much you offer. Try not to go too high or too low, especially if you’re aware of exactly how many people are interested in the house. Don’t get caught in a bidding war if you’re new to the property market either, it’s all too easy to get lose yourself in the idea of your new home, without realizing you’ll actually have to pay! Offers that are too low are going to be rejected, but people that are looking for a quick sale may be more likely to jump on them – make sure you do your research!

A big thanks to Ella Andrews for the informative article on one of the biggest & most rewarding financial decisions that you will ever make!

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