Calling All Bloggers – Guest Blogger Spots Available!

Guest Blogger Submission Guidelines

What we’re looking for: 

We’re looking for well-written posts/articles that consumers, designers, dealers, remodelers, builders, all business owners, entrepreneurs, food junkies, etc. would enjoy. Kitchens, Bathrooms, Homes, Interior Design, Color, Lighting, Organization, Storage, countertops, the list goes on & on!

 

Step One:

Submit a topic and a brief overview of the post content. You will get an approval or request for revision within 48 hours.

Once topic is approved follow the guidelines below for your post.

  • 400 words minimum
  • The post must be useful to the readers of this blog.
  • The post must be grammatically correct and well-written, Spell check before submitting your article(s).
  • The post must not include competitor links, competitor images or reference to our competition and must not be entirely self-promotional. No links to questionable websites (link farms, adult, etc.)
  • You are welcome to use images from our websites. If you use an image that is not yours please create a link to the owner’s site or note ownership on the image. We love images!!!
  • We reserve the right to edit your article (header tags, punctuation, grammar, etc.) and remove any questionable links.

Author Profile at the End:

The post may include links to your website and blog in a brief author’s bio. (Approximately 3 sentences), which will be published at the end of the guest post.

                          • You are welcome to include an author photo or logo.   
  • Links to your social network profiles (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+) can be included in your author profile.

Exciting News!!!

After your blog has been posted you will be included in our “GUEST BLOGGERS” section in the right hand column of our blog and you will be able to submit posts/ articles for consideration at any time. Your logo and a link to your website or blog will be included.

*Time frame: Once a post has been submitted, reviewed and scheduled it usually takes about 2 weeks. We want to create a “social relationship” around the post across all our sites and that requires planning.  Please note you will be notified of date and time of post, so you can promote across your social sites as well.

*Time frame can be subject to change without notice.

 

Remodeling Your Home: Kitchen and Bathroom

This guest post appears courtesy of Gary Bell of Bell Plumbing & Heating, a prominent Denver remodeling company specializing in kitchens and bathrooms with a gorgeous 8,500 sq. ft. showroom showcasing cabinets, vanities, tile, faucets, fixtures, tubs, showers, and more. Visit our YouTube channel for remodeling videos

Bell Plumbing

For many homeowners, remodeling can be both exciting and daunting. While it’s a wonderful way to customize your home, it also requires planning, temporary disruptions, and decision-making. Moreover, you need to hire a company you can trust, so that the job is completed on time and within your budget.

The bathroom and kitchen are popular spaces for home remodeling because of how much they are used, and what they are used for. A new kitchen will transform your diet, menu, and cooking, while a new bathroom can combine practicality with luxury. They are also the two spaces within the home that require extensive electricity and plumbing, so it often requires the work of a consummate contractor, or organizing several subcontractors to work together.

If you’re thinking of remodeling your bathroom or kitchen, you probably already have some kind of idea in your mind, however vague, of what you want it to look like. Perhaps you are already envisioning a walk-in shower with a deluxe rain showerhead or a large farm-style sink with a soapstone countertop for your kitchen. Jot your ideas down. Ask yourself some further questions: what’s lacking in my current bathroom, or what do I want my new kitchen to do that my current layout doesn’t allow? Make some more notes about your expectations. Get a hold of some interior design or bathroom/kitchen magazines from your local bookstore, and visit a remodeling showroom to pick up some brochures. This is the time for brainstorming your ideas. Is energy-efficiency important to you? What type of fixtures and lighting do you want? You might even try a sketch or two.

Next, take a good hard look at your budget. Know what you can spend on your remodeling project and give yourself a bit of leeway for last-minute additions and changes. Once you’ve got some numbers, head back to your design ideas. With these two in tow, call up your local remodeling professional to talk about an estimate. Make sure to find someone with a good reputation, and make sure you feel comfortable around that person. Because it’s your personal space that will undergo changes, remodeling is not only business, and for that reason, you want to find someone right for the job. Once you’ve arranged for a professional consultation, then you can begin to figure out which of your design ideas are realistic options, which ones may stretch your budget but not break it, and which are even possible given the layout of your home.

After some initial consulting and estimates, you and your trusty contractor are ready to begin the job. Depending on the size of the job, and the extent of your modifications, remodeling can take time. Communication is vital for time frames. Make sure that you have an agreed-upon timeline for your project. While even slight modifications to the plan may change this schedule, knowing how long the various stages of your project will last ensures that everyone is on the same page, and that your new bathroom or kitchen turns out the way you desired.

Thank you “Bell Plumbing & Heating” for the great post – very informative!

Audra Lamb, ASID — On a Design Mission!

This week we spotlight the talent of Audra Lamb ASID, with Sunset Tile and Bath who won big in 2010-2011’s Design Contest in the Bath Category.

Enjoy!

Design Mission: Create a more contemporary Master Bath for the McNail Household without adding more space or breaking the bank.

BeforeFloorPlan

Design Mission Statement:

This Master Bath’s builder grade configuration limited possibilities of elongated vanity as well as tub area. Reducing the vanity size allowed for enlarging tub platform and installing a tile surround.

 

Before
Before Audra Lamb & Wellborn

abefore002

The customer wanted to allow for a taller tub splash due to the roman tub faucet being modified into a wall mount diverter and spout.

faucet

The counter top backsplash was incorporated into the tub splash by continuing the travertine ogee molding and tumbled mesh to create a cohesive look through the bath.

AudraLambBathHM

AfterFloorPlan

 

 

 

 

 

In order to give the customer and more contemporary look, Prairie Maple cabinetry with a Sienna finish was used and allowed the bathroom to have balance between the light and dark finishes.

AudraLambBathHM

 

The drawers were upgraded to wood dovetail drawer boxes to give the customer a higher quality finish, but still keeping the cabinet economical.

The shower layout was reconfigured to allow the customer to incorporate and shower bench connecting with the tub platform.

After002

• The customers incorporated an adjustable shower arm to allow for customization between their different heights.

• We used natural travertine tiles in two colors and multiples sizes to give visual interest without being overwhelming in their space.

• We also incorporated a frameless heavy glass shower enclosure with clear glass to allow for easy visibility of the new tile patters as well as increasing the feeling of a larger bathroom.

 

The large format mirror was also replaced with two custom framed mirrors to give a more inviting look to the vanity area.

AudraLambBathHM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A slab travertine counter top with under mount sinks gave a neutral look to the vanity area and made the cabinetry more of a focal point in the room.

Mission Accomplished  – Great Work Audra!

Audra1

Audra Lamb, ASID
sunsettile.audra@qwestoffice.net
602-789-8700

Sunset Tile & Bath
sunsettile.audra@qwestoffice.net
602-789-8700

Our Emerald "Color of the Year" Tribute

As Pantone unveiled their 2013 Color of the Year – we just had to research Emerald and see what others are doing and how we can jump “on board” the Emerald Express.
So our tribute to “Emerald” begins: we searched through the pages of  Pinterest and Houzz  to find spaces and products where Emerald provides simple bursts of renewed energy or is intelligently positioned through-out an entire space to create the Wow that your space was needing!
Emerald truly can be a chameleon of spaces from the elegant decor of dining rooms of old to vintage basement retreats created for fun-filled weekends. We don’t even begin to address clothing, make-up or other industries outside of fashion…. 🙂
Emerald can be your theme….simple to dynamic…. Emerald truly answers the “color call” this year!
(pay attention to the others as well…..)
Houzz is alive with the evolution of Emerald! Can’t wait to see all the new additions for 2013!
Eclectic Family Room design by Atlanta Interior Designer Cristi Holcombe
Traditional Living Room design by Little Rock Interior Designer Tobi Fairley Interior Design
Eclectic Living Room design by Los Angeles Interior Designer Diane Bennett Bedford
Contemporary Bedroom design by St Louis Interior Designer Edwin Pepper Interiors
Contemporary Dining Room design by Other Metro Architect Annis Lender
Eclectic Bedroom design by Melbourne Interior Designer Diane Bergeron Interiors
Contemporary Bedroom design by Portland Interior Designer Ragan Corliss

Gary Tilson’s Milan Minimalist Bathroom Design

Gary Tilson’s Award Winning Milan Bathroom Design is a very clean minimalist design but is anything but simple….

The clients had already renovated portions of their home including new wood floors in the master

bedroom before coming to me for a design consultation.

5

They were ready to upgrade their outdated bath. Remodel Size:13’6″ x 11′ 4″

before

Meetings with them identified some key concerns and wishes for their new Master Bath.

They wanted a spa-like bath with clean lines.

full

They chose Wellborn’s Milan Cherry in Autumn Spice, setting the tone for the project.

Kohler vessel sinks and faucets continued the clean look.

2

Keeping with their minimalist tastes, they decided to do away with pulls. Where necessary, touch latches were added to aid in opening doors / drawers.

3

Matching Wellborn trim was added including a valance above sinks with recessed lighting, door casings, caps over the tile wainscot and window casings.

mir

The original entry to the Master Closet was through the bath taking up valuable wall and circulation space.

The entry was closed in favor of a new door directly from the bedroom which freed up additional wall

space for the shower and toilet areas.

shower

The original entry to the bath was from a nook at the far end of the bedroom.

The entry was moved to an adjacent wall which was already in the circulation path.

A pair of pocket doors freed up wall space for switches that would have been hidden behind a swinging

door.

An Ecofires firebox with cabinets and shelving matching those of the bath were installed in the alcove

creating an intimate sitting area for reading.

after

Additional functional solutions to their needs include:

Hamper base cabinet, Milan doors on the tub surround to access Whirlpool pump,

4

Pilaster units each side of the sinks with doors and electrical outlets within,

towel

Heated Towel Bar and Heated Floor, and a more efficient allocation of circulation space allowing a fuller use of the existing square footage.

The clean lines of the Milan door style with the warm rich Autumn Spice finish on Cherry along with the

other material selections helped to create the sophisticated contemporary result that the well-traveled

clients sought.

And also became an Award-Winning Design for Gary Tilson!

Gary Tilson Barefoot Kitchens & Bath
678-753-5343

tilton

Elegant Bath Collection – Details to Discover! Details to Delight!

Ascott Designer Suite

Delightful Details from the Elegant Bath Collection. Top to bottom the Ascott Designer Suite has the details that deliver a beautiful bathroom…..

  • 3/4″ Rope columns that frame each base cabinet and tall cabinet
Rope Column Detail
Rope Column Detail
Classic Base makes a Soft Statement
Classic Base makes a Soft Statement
  • 4 1/2″ classic base that creates furniture out of every base and tall cabinet
  • Available in Overlay Door Styles and Inset Door Styles
  • Available in Stains and Paints
  • Available in Cherry, Maple and Oak
Medicine Cabinet with Class
Medicine Cabinet with Class

Details to create your “Dream Bath” today!

NKBA Reveals Top Kitchen & Bath Trends for 2012

Thursday, February 16, 2012

Hackettstown, NJ (February 16, 2012) – More than 350 National Kitchen & Bath Association member designers took part in the 2012 NKBA Design Trends Survey to cite the materials, product types, and styles that they’ve incorporated into their kitchen and bath designs over the final three months of 2011. While broad trends won’t be evident in every local market, the following are 10 overall trends for kitchens and baths across the United States and Canada.

KITCHENS

Cherry Wood  – What’s the future?

Photo courtesy of Wellborn Cabinet, Inc

Cherry wood has consistently been the first or second most popular type of wood for cabinetry, jockeying for the top spot with maple each year. However, designers are slowly shifting away from it. While 80% of NKBA member kitchen designers had recently specified cherry cabinetry as 2010 approached, that figure dropped to 72% last year and fell again to 69% heading into 2012.

No one other wood species is taking that market share on its own, as even maple dropped in popularity this year, falling from 77% last year to 70% now. Instead, a number of lesser-used woods are being specified more often, including oak, which is specified by twice as many designers now (22%) versus two years ago (11%); walnut, which has increased from 3% in 2010 to 9% in 2011 to 13% today; birch, which is now specified by three times as many kitchen designers as it was a year ago (15% vs. 5%), and bamboo, which has doubled from 5% last year to 10% now. While alder is currently specified by 27% of kitchen designers, that figure is down from 30% last year and from 40% two years ago.

Darker Finishes

Photo courtesy of Poggenpohl

Natural kitchen cabinetry continues a steady move toward darker finishes. While light natural finishes have been recently specified by 30% of kitchen designers, medium natural finishes stand at 55%, with dark natural finishes at 58%. Two years ago, dark natural finishes were specified by only 43% of designers.

Photo courtesy of Wellborn Cabinet, Inc

Among painted cabinetry, white continues to be the most popular option, as white cabinets have been recently specified by 59% of NKBA member kitchen designers, while other colors were specified by only 38% of designers. Another trend to note is that distressed finishes are making a comeback. After being recently specified by 15% of designers going into 2010, that figure dropped to just 5% last year, but has now risen to 22%.

Glass Backsplashes

Photo courtesy of ThinkGlass

Although glass remains a niche material for kitchen countertops, it’s been recently used by more than half of kitchen designers as a backsplash material, rising from 41% a year ago to 52% now. This trails only natural stone tile at 60% and ceramic tile (including porcelain), which has been specified of late by some 74% of designers. Even at that high rate, ceramic tile backsplashes are on the decline, as they stood at 78% a year ago and 88% two years ago.

Other popular backsplash materials are granite at 30% and quartz at 20%. The popularity of these materials as backsplashes is due to their high use as countertop materials. Finishing off a granite or quartz countertop with a matching backsplash is quite common; however, the same doesn’t hold true for solid surfaces. While these materials are very popular for countertops (see Solid Surfaces below), they’re seldom used for backsplashes, as they’re specified by just 11% of designers.

LED Lighting

Photo courtesy of Lutron

Energy-efficiency is clearly not a fad, but a real trend that can be seen taking hold in homes across the United States and Canada. Despite the higher initial cost, light-emitting diode, or LED, lighting is proof of this trend. Specified by 50% of NKBA member kitchen designers entering 2010, that rate increased to 54% the following year and has jumped over the past year to 70%. However, compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) aren’t sharing in this trend. Although they use roughly a quarter the energy of an incandescent bulb when producing the same amount of light, measured in lumens, the poor color of the light they produce and the presence of mercury in these bulbs are keeping them out of newly remodeled kitchens, falling from 36% last year to 26% today.

Older incandescent bulbs stand at just 42%, a figure we expect to fall next year due in part to the U.S. ban on newly produced 100-watt incandescent bulbs that went into effect on January 1. A ban on 75-watt incandescent bulbs will go into effect on January 1, 2013, followed by 60- and 40-watt incandescent bulbs on January 1, 2014.

Pull-Out Faucets

Photo courtesy of ROHL

Pull-out kitchen faucets have become established as the dominant type of kitchen faucet. Designers are increasingly eschewing the standard faucet with a detached side spray in favor of pull-out models that integrate the two functions into a single unit. Viewing the large number of new pull-out faucet models at the NKBA’s Kitchen & Bath Industry Show, it’s clear these units can be seamlessly incorporated into almost any kitchen design style.

While standard kitchen faucets were specified by just under half of designers as 2010 approached, barely more than a third of designers have recently specified them. Meanwhile, the use of pull-out faucets has increased from 88% to 91% to 93%. In other words, 14 of out every 15 designers who designed a kitchen over the final three months of 2011 incorporated a pull-out faucet. These versatile models might also be mitigating the need for pot-filler faucets, which have been recently specified by just 28% of designers, down from 41% two years ago.

BATHROOMS

Medicine Cabinets

Photo courtesy of NuTone

The tried-and-true medicine cabinet had been swept aside in bathroom remodels over the past several years, replaced by decorative wall mirrors. However, as homeowners look for more efficient use of space, most designers are now turning toward medicine cabinets as an effective way to gain additional storage without having to increase the footprint of a room, attenuating the need for separate shelving, cabinetry, or other storage options.

After being specified by 43% of NKBA member bathroom designers leading into 2010, medicine cabinets dropped to 36% last year. However, as we enter 2012, some 66% have recently incorporated a medicine cabinet into a bathroom remodel.

KITCHENS & BATHROOMS

Transitional Over Traditional

For the first time since the NKBA began tracking annual design trends, traditional is no longer the most popular type of design. In both the kitchen and the bathroom, transitional is now the most common style.

Photos courtesy of Wellborn Cabinet, Inc

While the traditional style has consistently been used by roughly three quarters of NKBA member designers in both the kitchen and the bath, that figure fell to 58% in kitchens and 59% in bathrooms this year.

These figures come in just below the transitional style, which is a blend of traditional and contemporary, typified by lines that are simpler than traditional, but a bit more elaborate than contemporary in order to create a modern classic look. Contemporary is the next most common style, up 5% to 52% in kitchens and up 10% to 53% in bathrooms from a year ago. Shaker, arts & crafts, and cottage remain the next most frequently used styles.

Solid Surfaces

Photo courtesy of Cosentino

A year ago, the use of solid surfaces was a key trend in the kitchen; this year, it’s an even stronger trend, and one that impacts both the kitchen and the bathroom. In the NKBA’s 2011 Design Trends Survey, the use of solid surfaces in the kitchen jumped from 11% to 26% from the year earlier. This year, that number has increased again, as solid surfaces have been specified recently by 30% of designers for use in kitchens. At the same time, while granite and quartz continue to be the clear #1 and #2 choices, their popularity has waned just slightly, with granite falling from 91% to 87% and quartz declining just a bit from 71% to 69%.

The same pattern holds true in newly remodeled bathrooms, as solid surfaces have over the past year risen from 26% to 34%, as granite has fallen from 84% to 71%. Quartz’s popularity has dipped over that time from 56% to 53%. Marble is currently the third most popular vanity top material at 41%, up 3% from a year ago. Also notable is the use of glass vanity tops, which has more than doubled over the past two years, from 5% heading into 2010 to 11% today.

Shades of Gray

Photo courtesy of Benjamin Moore

When artfully incorporated into a space, gray color schemes can allow for very attractive, distinguished looks without overpowering a design—the key reason why gray is now used as the backdrop for the NKBA logo. In kitchens, gray was used as the overall color scheme by only 9% of designers as we moved into 2010, but that figure nearly doubled (to 17%) last year and then nearly doubled again (to 33%) this year. Over that time, the use of gray color schemes has risen just as dramatically from 12% to 21% to 40% in bathroom remodels.

Whites and off-whites continue to be the most popular color schemes in the kitchen and bathroom, followed by beiges and bones. Brown is the third most popular color in kitchens and the fourth most popular in bathrooms, just behind gray.

In the kitchen, bronzes/terracottas have risen over the past two years from 20% to 25% to 31%, while greens have increased from 18% two years ago to 32% today. Green was the color trend in bathrooms last year, being specified by 25% of designers, and its use has remained exactly the same this year. Blue has emerged as the fifth most popular color in bathrooms, rising from 23% to 30%.

Polished Chrome is Back

Photo courtesy of Kohler Co.

Supplanted by brushed metal finishes in the past, polished chrome is staging a comeback. After being specified by 34% of designers in kitchens last year, polished chrome has recently been specified by 52% of NKBA member designers in kitchens today. In the bathroom, polished chrome use has increased from 46% to 65% over the past year. At the same time, polished nickel is up from 17% to 25% in kitchens and from 28% to 32% in bathrooms over the past year.

The increased use of polished finishes is clearly coming at the expense of brushed finishes. Over the past two years, brushed nickel is down from 62% to 46% in kitchens and from 66% to 46% in bathrooms. Brushed chrome is down from 20% to 17% over the past year in kitchens, but has increased from 11% to 18% in bathrooms. Meanwhile, over the past year, satin nickel—which lies between a polished and a brushed finish—is down from 64% to 56% in the kitchen and from 57% to 52% in the bathroom.

Only stainless steel has managed to clearly buck the trend away from brushed finishes, as it rose slightly from 46% to 50% in the kitchen and increased significantly from 16% to 28% in the bathroom. Bronze finishes continue to be popular, but dipped a bit from a year ago, falling from 49% to 41% in kitchens, while their use remained flat at 41% in bathrooms.

About the National Kitchen & Bath Association

The National Kitchen & Bath Association (NKBA) is a non-profit trade association that has educated and led the kitchen and bath industry for more than 45 years. NKBA.org provides consumers with an inspiration gallery of award-winning kitchen and bath designs, as well as articles, tips, and an extensive glossary of remodeling terms. At NKBA.org, consumers can also find certified kitchen and bath professionals in their areas, submit questions to NKBA experts, and order the free NKBA Kitchen Planner and NKBA Bath Planner. To learn more, visit the NKBA Press Room or call 1-800-THE-NKBA (843-6522).